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Debate Rages Over Supply of Foreclosed Homes

April 30th, 2010 9:13 AM by Lehel S.

Why is there such a fierce debate about whether the housing market is slowly healing or heading for another free fall? Partly because no one can estimate with much confidence how many foreclosed homes banks need to sell or how fast they are getting rid of all that property..

A huge chunk of today’s housing supply comes from homes that have been acquired by banks or mortgage investors through foreclosure, plus those that are being offered by people who hope to avoid foreclosure by doing “short sales,” selling their homes for less than the mortgage balance due. The National Association of Realtors estimates that such “distressed” situations accounted for 35% of home sales in February and March. (See Foreclosure Estimate Falls.)

The latest heroic attempt to tally how many foreclosed homes are available for sale comes from analysts at Barclays Capital in New York. They estimate that banks and mortgage investors including Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac owned 480,000 homes at the end of February. That’s far lower than previous estimates. Barclays explains that it has acquired more data on mortgages and refined its methods for analyzing foreclosure trends. Under the bank’s previous methods, the estimate for February would have been more than 600,000.

Estimating the inventory of foreclosed homes is tricky because thousands of banks and others that own the properties disclose those holdings in varying ways, if at all. RealtyTrac Inc., another data provider and one of the few other firms that regularly makes such calculations, estimates that banks and mortgage investors own 758,000 foreclosed homes.

So we have a pretty big gap. Is it 480,000 as Barclays thinks, or 758,000, as per RealtyTrac? Tom Lawler, an independent housing economist who tracks reams of housing data when he isn’t tending the livestock on his farm near Leesburg, Va., figures the total is more than 550,000 but probably less than the RealtyTrac estimate.

“What is truly disturbing,” Mr. Lawler wrote in his daily housing-market commentary Wednesday, “is that given all of the economic data the government tracks, the sector it appears to track the worst is…the housing market!  Why is it that the government has not deployed more resources to better track and report data on the housing inventory, households, home sales, home prices, and, of course, foreclosures and the number of homeowners who have lost their home to foreclosure?”

(That’s an especially good question given that the U.S. government has a bit of exposure to the housing market. Inside Mortgage Finance reports that mortgages backed by government-related entities – Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, the FHA and the VA – accounted for more than 96% of home loans originated in the first quarter.)

Whatever the number of homes that banks, the federal agencies and private mortgage investors own now, it’s likely to increase. Barclays expects the inventory generally to rise over the next 20 months, peaking at 536,000 in January 2012, and then decline gradually.

To get a rough sense of how many more households will lose their homes to foreclosures or related actions, Barclays tallies what it calls a “shadow inventory,” consisting of homeowners 90 days or more overdue on mortgage payments or already in the foreclosure process. At the end of February, 4.6 million households were in that category.

Barclays expects 1.6 million “distressed sales” of homes – mainly foreclosures or short sales – both this year and in 2011, then a slight decline to 1.5 million in 2012. Last year, Barclays estimates, such sales totaled 1.5 million. Around 30% of all home sales this year and next will be foreclosure-related, forecasts Robert Tayon, a mortgage analyst at Barclays, who says that would be only about 6% in a normal housing market.

Barclays expects U.S. home prices on average to fall another 3% to 5% over the next couple of years, adding to a decline of about 30% already recorded since 2006. That forecast assumes a gradual improvement in the unemployment rate to 8% within the next two years from 9.7% in March. The home-price picture would worsen if job growth sputters or banks “push homes through the foreclosure pipeline faster than expected,” Mr. Tayon says.

Efforts to avert foreclosures by offering many borrowers lower payments have slowed the flow of homes into bank ownership. In some parts of the country, such as the Las Vegas area and Orange County, Calif., that has left bargain-hunters frustrated by what they see as a shortage of bank-owned properties in attractive neighborhoods.

In the Las Vegas area, foreclosed homes accounted for 56% of sales in March, down from 73% a year earlier, according to MDA DataQuick, a research firm.

Posted in:General
Posted by Lehel S. on April 30th, 2010 9:13 AM

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